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Fencing in Democracy: Border Walls, Necrocitizenship, and the Security State

Fencing in Democracy: Border Walls, Necrocitizenship, and the Security State

On Monday, March 2nd, 2020, come to the Library Auditorium at 4 p.m. and join us in discussion onFencing in Democracy: Border Walls, Necrocitizenship, and the Security State with Miguel Diaz-Barriga and Margaret Dorsey.

Border walls permeate our world, with more than thirty nation-states constructing them. Anthropologists Margaret E. Dorsey and Miguel Díaz-Barriga argue that border wall construction manifests transformations in citizenship practices that are aimed not only at keeping migrants out but also at enmeshing citizens into a wider politics of exclusion. For a decade, the authors studied the U.S.-Mexico border wall constructed by the Department of Homeland Security and observed the political protests and legal challenges that residents mounted in opposition to the wall. In Fencing in Democracy Dorsey and Díaz-Barriga take us to those border communities most affected by the wall and often ignored in national discussions about border security to highlight how the state diminishes citizens’ rights. That dynamic speaks to the citizenship experiences of border residents that is indicative of how walls imprison the populations they are built to protect. Dorsey and Díaz-Barriga brilliantly expand conversations about citizenship, the operation of U.S. power, and the implications of border walls for the future of democracy.

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